Help your data be understood

Communication is a vital component of data analysis. You can have the best analysis with visualization, but if no one understands it — who cares?

Screen with line chart
Photo by energepic.com from Pexels

This Harvard Business Review article give three key points to help your audience understand your data.

  1. Connect data to a relatable size
  2. Connect data to a relatable time
  3. Connect data to relatable things

To read more about how to make your data be understood, go to:

Think you need to be a data scientist?

Harvard Business Review named the data scientist the sexiest job of the 21st century. This job requires significant computing and statistical skills.

With the rise of analytics and artificial intelligence, these skills are needed, but even more critical are individuals that have excellent business acumen.

These individuals can fill the role of translator. Not in the traditional language sense, but translate business requirements for the technical individuals.

” translators play a critical role in bridging the technical expertise of data engineers and data scientists with the operational expertise of marketing, supply chain, manufacturing, risk, and other frontline managers. In their role, translators help ensure that the deep insights generated through sophisticated analytics translate into impact at scale in an organization.  “

For more on these roles, see the article at: https://hbr.org/2018/02/you-dont-have-to-be-a-data-scientist-to-fill-this-must-have-analytics-role?

Can you trust your data?

As businesses move to more AI-generated modeling and higher forms of data analytics, we still need to apply common sense? In other words, don’t blindly trust the data.

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

This articles describes some of the pitfalls of not critically analyzing data output and gives some solutions.

https://www.datasciencecentral.com/profiles/blogs/data-and-analytics-don-t-trust-numbers-blindly

New to Analytics? — Start here

Think you are new to analytics? You may have a start. Most of us in business, and especially accounting are quite adept in Excel. This makes the tool a perfect place to start. You cannot use the largest data sets, but with new Excel tools such as PowerPivot, that is constantly increasing.

Analyzing data in Excel helps you learn the process of determining which questions can be answered from the data and using an analytics technique to summarize. If you can do a Pivot Table in Excel, you are on the road to learning more about analytics.

For more information, see this article from Computerworld: https://www.computerworld.com/article/3315737/use-microsoft-excel-to-learn-about-data-analytics.html